Listen to internet radio with GeneaBloggers on Blog Talk Radio

Our Partners

Calabria Logo
Calabria Exchange

IL CIRCOLO CALABRESE - The world's oldest and largest organization devoted to the study and preservation of the genealogy, history, culture and language of the Calabria region of Italy.

Italian Genealogy

Italian Fine Foods Logo
Enter the code GENTE when ordering to receive a 5% discount on your shopping cart.
November 2014
S M T W T F S
« May    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Posts Tagged ‘Census’

Free access to the 1911 census!

In an email I received this morning:

View the 1911 census for free on findmypast.co.uk

View the 1911 census for free on findmypast.co.uk

We know what a brilliant resource the 1911 census is for any family historian, so we’re giving it to you for free!

Until 18 November 2012, view a 1911 census transcript for free on findmypast.co.uk – this usually costs 10 credits.

We’ve also drastically reduced the cost of viewing an original 1911 census image – you’ll pay just 5 credits instead of 30.

There’s more good news: we always strive to offer our customers value for money, so when this offer ends on 18 November, we’ll permanently reduce the price of viewing the 1911 census to 5 credits for a transcription and 5 credits for an original image.

Free Civil War Documents on Footnote.com – Limited Time

Footnote Logo

Footnote has worked with the US  National Archives to put millions of Civil War records online and now, for the month of June you can view the collection free of charge.

Included in the collection are thousands of  photos, maps, service records, and pension files,  as well as some personal accounts and writings making it the largest collection of it’s kind.

When you log on you will go straight to the Civil War Website Pages and upon browsing the links you can view a copy of Abraham Lincoln and family on the 1860 Census.

While I’m not sure this will help me with my Italian family research it is still worth looking through and may aid you in yours so take advantage of the free offer and look through the site.  You never know what you may find!

Census Idea – Helpful Tips #3

This advice came from one of the Rootsweb Lists I read.  Upon filling out your census form, make copies of it to keep in your records. This will ensure that the next generations in your family won’t have to wait the required number of years for the census records to become public!

We will be doing this and a poster also suggested perhaps scanning and saving it to CD.  What an excellent idea!

New Horizons Genealogy – “Specializing in New England and New York Colonial American Ancestry”

From their Website:

New Horizons Genealogy specializes in New England and New York Colonial American Genealogy, Ancestry and Family History. Our record collections include, Vital records, Barbour Collection of Connecticut Vital Records, Colonial and State Census records, Federal and State Census Mortality Schedules, Cemetery records, 1840 Census of Pensioners and Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried in New York State. We also include links to other quality genealogy records to help make these collections as complete as possible.

An amazing collection of transcribed New England records from 1830 – onwards.  Their goal is to transcribe all US State Census recordsand all Federal and State Mortality Schedules transcribed and indexed in one place and to provide free access to everyone read more …

Definitely worth looking through.  Please contact the webmaster if you would like to volunteer in the transcription project.
New Horizons Genealogy
PO Box 242
Fonda, NY 12068

email: nhgenealogy@yahoo.com

Indices to Canadian Censuses

I want to share this interesting site today that allows you to search several Canadian Census records from 1851 – 1911. It also has some other great records such as links to the Soldiers of the First World War , births, marriage and deaths. Transcription, proof reading, and linking is done by volunteers and no registration or payment is required to view the index.

As much as I do enjoy using Ancestry, It’s great to always have options. And as most of my favourite sites, it’s free. Have a look and see what you think..

http://automatedgenealogy.com/

WDYTYA-Susan Sarandon Re Cap

Well I have to say that tonight’s show was definitely my favorite and actually lived up to what I was expecting from this series.
I loved everything about this show. The introduction at the beginning was just long enough to provide the background information we needed to know without putting us to sleep and she clearly identified her goals – she wanted to know what happened to Anita Rigali, her grandmother who disappeared when Susan’s mother was just a toddler. Armed with an old photo and some family stories she interviews her mother.

Rigali

She discovers that her grandmother was still alive in the late 1930’s and her mother shows her another photo of Anita and herself taken at the State Fair. There was also some wonderful background history and pictures of the living conditions in lower Manhattan during the big immigration boom that took place in the late 1800’s and why Italians left their homes in the first place to fly to this new promise land.

Anita Rigali


Susan finds out her great grandparents had several children but only 3 lived which is listed on Anita’s birth certificate – As I look through the 1910 Census I find that the same is listed there. It also states that her great grandfather was married previously which they fail to mention.
With the help of her youngest son, Susan undertakes much of her own research. Using Genlabs, she is able to locate where the surnames she is interested in are concentrated the most in Italy leading her to Tuscany. While there, she visits with local historians and goes to the church where her ancestors were baptized. Using these Latin records she finds she has deep Tuscan roots as she is able to trace her family back to 1640.
Once back in the US she uses birth, marriage, city directories and obituaries to trace Anita’s steps – and she does most of this on her own or with the help of her son- which leads her to Rockland County, a place only about an hour from where she lives. It’s important to note that Susan’s son suggests searching using only the first name and birth date of Anita to help track her down – nicely done!
She visits to the house where Anita lived, talked to neighbours and finally visits with Anita’ s nieces.
Susan’s ancestor was colourful but was no different from many we find in our own ancestry. The whole episode encourages people to research their roots and gives realistic exceptions of what one can expect to find or which resources one can use to help them. I hope they use this as a template for future episodes.

Social Media Icons Powered by Acurax Web Design Company
Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterCheck Our FeedVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On Google PlusVisit Us On LinkedinVisit Us On Youtube